Homeowner's Academy

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The Passover Seder

by BROOKE GOLD HASSON | Apr 14, 2014

iStock_000007094502Small-300x189Keeping Children Entertained During the Seder

Chag Sameach! We at People’s Trust wish a Happy Passover to all of you celebrating.

One interesting part of the Seder is afikomen, which comes from the Greek word meaning “that which comes after” or “dessert.” It’s a piece of matza (unleavened bread) that is broken during an early part of the Seder and provides lots of entertainment for the children in attendance.

Remember to follow normal party safety precautions for your Seder.

Preparing the Afikomen

The afikomen is prepared during Yachatz, the fourth part of the Seder.  For this ritual, the Seder leader stacks the meal’s three matza and then removes the middle piece. The matza is broken into two pieces; the smaller piece is returned to the table and the larger is wrapped in a cloth or napkin. This larger piece is the afikomen.

The afikomen represents the Passover lamb and it is hidden to help keep the attention of children during the long night.

The afikomen is traditionally eaten last after it has been found and the Seder meal is over. Tradition says it should be eaten before midnight.

Hiding, Finding and Eating the Matza

The afikomen is traditionally hidden by leader of the Seder. Children are allowed to search for it. Whomever finds it brings it back to the table and receives a prize for their discovery. Typically the prize is money or candy.

If you need help explaining the afikomen to children, Sesame Street has a song and conversation that may be a big help.

Once the afikomen is found, it is returned to the table. After the Seder meal and customary desserts, the leader of the Seder will distribute a piece of the afikomen to each guest.

After the afikomen is eaten, no other foods can be consumed for the rest of the night. Seder guests and hosts may still have the final two cups of Seder wine as well as some other drinks like coffee, water, and tea.